Official advice for New Zealanders living and travelling overseas

ALERT - COVID-19 Do not travel overseas at this time. Due to the difficulty travellers are experiencing returning home, New Zealanders overseas need to take steps to stay safely where they are and shelter in place....Read more

ALERT - COVID-19 Do not travel overseas at this time. Due to the difficulty travellers are experiencing returning home, New Zealanders overseas need to take steps to stay safely where they are and shelter in place....Read more

  • Reviewed: 19 November 2013, 10:04 NZDT
  • Still current at: 20 September 2020

Security

There is an increased, global risk of terrorism. No country is immune from a terrorist attack, and no person is immune from becoming a victim of an attack. Terrorists have little regard for civilian casualties and in many cases, attacks are designed to maximise casualties.

Although New Zealand travellers may not be targeted deliberately, they are usually indistinguishable from any “Western” tourist and frequent places where other Western tourists are found. This puts New Zealanders at the same risk as others.

Wherever you are, you should keep yourself informed about the latest alerts and stay aware of your surroundings in areas where large numbers of people congregate, such as shopping malls, markets, monuments, demonstrations and on any public transport.

Kidnappings and bombings have been the hallmark of several groups operating in the southern Philippines such as the Moro Islamic Liberation Front and the Abu Sayyaf Group. In Indonesia members of the Jemaah Islamiyah (which allegedly has links to Al Qaeda) have been charged with responsibility for the Bali Bombings in 2002 and 2005. There is a risk of kidnapping of foreigners travelling to the islands and coastal areas in Eastern Sabah (from Kudat in the north around eastwards to Tawau) by the Abu Sayyaf Group operating out of the Philippines.

Other countries in Southeast Asia, particularly those with Islamic populations, have terrorism concerns. Accordingly, there is now a region-wide warning out about the possibility of terrorist attacks in Southeast Asia.

In many Asian countries, including Singapore, Malaysia, Thailand, Indonesia and Viet Nam, the penalties for drug offences (possession or trafficking) are severe and can include the death penalty. The possession of even small quantities of drugs for recreational purposes can result in lengthy jail sentences and deportation. While "party pills" may be legal in New Zealand, travellers should not take them on holiday overseas as they are classed as prohibited substances/drugs in many countries.

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